Author Archive: Eugene R.

What happens in Dallas never stays in Dallas

For the beginning of a new year, the Beamers went back to a very fateful old year, following a Maine English teacher with a nostalgic love for the America of the ’50s and its president of the ’60s as detailed in Stephen King’s 11/22/63.  Did the Beamers discover that root beer really did taste better …

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The King is mightier with the PEN

Stephen King, a Beamer favorite and this month’s author (11/22/63 being the January Beamer selection), has been awarded the PEN America Literary Service Award for his contributions in opposing oppression and championing the best in humanity through his prose, his philanthropy, and his public support for freedom of expression on any and all topics.  In …

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Nor any drop to drink

So, if Mars was “wet”, where did the water go?  (And it may have been as much as 1/2 of the volume of Earth’s oceans.)  Ryan Mandelbaum on Gizmodo reports on a recent model of Martian hydrology published in Nature by a group of Oxford geophysicists (or areophysicists, perhaps).  In short, Mars has a higher …

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The missus and the ex: Sarah Jane Smith

On Tor.com, writer and Doctor Who podcaster (Verity!) Tansy Rayner Roberts has posted a long and loving look at the varied careers of Elizabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane Smith, companion to the 3rd (Pertwee) and 4th (Baker) Doctors, as well as lead human character in the abortive spin-off K9 and Company and her own Sarah …

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And she lived, ever after

Coming up on the dark time of the year, with the longest nights, the Beamers took a trip into the darker recesses of fairy tales and folklore with Tanith Lee’s collection of revised tales, Redder Than Blood.  Known for her wide-ranging interests and settings, Ms. Lee was one of the originators of the current fictional …

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The more things change, the more time travelers they attract

With the newly darkened evenings upon us, the Beamers looked back in time to the truly dark days of the Black Death (or “blue sickness”) as depicted in Connie Willis’s time travel novel, Doomsday Book, her piercing portrayal of the all-too-human tragedies that are so easily swept up in the great and momentous events of …

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Digging up the dirt on … rabbits!

In 1974, BBC interviewer Robert Robinson unearthed the truth about Richard Adams’s lapine libido: Perhaps the most interesting revelation is Mr. Adams recounting how the story of Watership Down started as a story to entertain his children during a drive to Stratford-on-Avon, making the rabbit reverie a mid-summer afternoon’s dream.

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The Wizardess of Earthsea

For the Folio Society publication of The Wizard of Earthsea (2015), British novelist David Mitchell, best known for his Cloud Atlas interwoven speculative tale, offered a heartfelt appreciation of Ms. Le Guin’s compelling fantasy creation, the archipelago of Earthsea: Earthsea is a fantasy world, and proud of it, mapped by its creator in 1966–7 on …

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Once bitten, twice read

Amid the welter of novels that feature vampires, the Beamers decided for October to go back to the founding classic of the genre, Dracula by Bram Stoker.  An amazing assemblage of journal entries, travelogues, newspaper clippings, and lots of folklore, Stoker’s novel, published at the end of the Nineteenth century, moved a fictional fright out …

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Repent, Englishman!, said the Ticktockman

On a cool evening at the end of a Summer that is, the Beamers came together to step back to a Victorian London that never was but perhaps should have been.  Natasha Pulley’s debut novel, The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, unites the fabled capital of the British Empire with Irish revolutionaries, Japanese emigres, the magic …

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