Tag Archives: Mars

Nor any drop to drink

So, if Mars was “wet”, where did the water go?  (And it may have been as much as 1/2 of the volume of Earth’s oceans.)  Ryan Mandelbaum on Gizmodo reports on a recent model of Martian hydrology published in Nature by a group of Oxford geophysicists (or areophysicists, perhaps).  In short, Mars has a higher …

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Growing oceans in the shadow of the magnetic balloon

Matt Williams on the Universal Science website has reported that a NASA study of terraforming Mars presented at the Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop suggests that a major factor in restoring an atmosphere and, eventually, oceans, could be an inflatable, magnetic-field generating structure placed at the Lagrange L1 point, gravitationally balanced on the line between …

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Go up and out, young one!

For exhibit in the Kennedy Space Flight Center’s Visitors Complex, NASA in 2009 commissioned a set of recruitment posters for the Mars Explorer Corps.  Now, the posters are available for download on-line, in high-resolution JPEG or TIF files, suitable for reproduction at full size (30″ x 48″).

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Wet planet Mars

NASA has announced that Mars has flowing water.  It is found in subsurface flows, is rather briny, and only flows during summer warm weather (temperatures at or above -10 degrees Fahrenheit, -23 degrees Celsius).  The strongest evidence are dark streaks called “recurring slope lineae” (RSL) that show up on the faces of crater walls periodically. …

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Climate change most extreme

If the current state of climate debate here on planet Earth seems a bit fraught with pending disaster, NASA has been studying the past history of our neighbor (and nearest partner in climate) Mars, and they are ready to proclaim that what is past is not quite prologue to what is present.  An entire ocean, …

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