Tag Archives: Science Fiction

Vaster than empires: Ursula Le Guin introduces her Hainish stories

On Tor.com, the introductions to the new 2-volume boxed set, The Hainish Novels & Stories, from the Library of America, have been posted.  Written by Ms. Le Guin, they give background on how she wrote some of the groundbreaking sf of the 1960s and ’70s, like The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed.  And …

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Taking and talking detours aboard the Wayfarer

For a pleasant August evening, the Beamers spent a pleasant couple of hours going over and under the various elements that Becky Chambers used to create her Wayfarer universe, as seen in her debut novel, The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet.  While the destination of the crew is, indeed, a small, geologically active …

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A long way across a big, mildly upset planet

In the summer swelter of mid-July, the Beamers cooled off with some beverages at Panera’s and with an epic quest across a mammoth planet that kept us distracted from the heat, all the way to Lord Valentine’s Castle.  Robert Silverberg’s planetary romance was a bit radical when published in 1980, marking a major departure from …

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Woo Who!

The next Doctor Who will be a woman, Jodie Whittaker. Ms. Whittaker, a native of Yorkshire, England, is known for appearing in Attack the Block (2011), One Day (2011) and St. Trinian’s (2007).

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Galaxy Fest

355 issues of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine are now available for reading online or downloading here. According to Wikipedia: “Galaxy Science Fiction was an American digest-size science fiction magazine, published from 1950 to 1980. It was founded by an Italian company, World Editions, which was looking to break into the American market. World Editions hired …

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The whole is other than the sum of the parts

On a pleasantly brisk Spring evening, the Beamers came together to examine the coming together of a science fiction classic, More Than Human, by Theodore Sturgeon.  Built around his story, “Baby is Three”, it tells of how the next step in human evolution is built around a melding of different, somewhat damaged, individuals into a …

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Nor any drop to drink 

At the start of a new year, the Beamers turned resolutely toward the Future.  Not a cheery Future, alas, but a realistic one of wars over water rights, right here in the US.  Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Water Knife depicts the struggles to survive in a drying Southwest, where states launch military raids to prevent other …

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How do I radiate thee? Let me Geiger counter the ways …

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has announced the winners of its annual poetry contest, with Dwarf Form (10 or fewer lines), Short Form, and Long Form (50+ lines) poems selected.  Winners, 2nd, and 3rd place finishers are all on display on the 2016 contest web page on the SFPA website.  The judge, Michael Kriesel, poet …

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A short way to forever

On a steamy September evening, the Beamers hitched up their literary packs and loaded their reading protocols to take a classic sf hill, The Forever War by Joe Haldeman.  Long acclaimed as a classic of the military sf sub-genre, would this 40-year-old book stand up to the withering fire of Beamer criticisms and critiques, or …

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Resolved: A book should be resolved!

On a sultry August evening, the thunderstorms threatened outside and inside as the Beamers tried to wrestle a meaning out of our latest book, Central Station by Lavie Tidhar, a short work that seemed overly long on ideas but not on plot.

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