Tag Archives: Horror

Once bitten, twice read

Amid the welter of novels that feature vampires, the Beamers decided for October to go back to the founding classic of the genre, Dracula by Bram Stoker.  An amazing assemblage of journal entries, travelogues, newspaper clippings, and lots of folklore, Stoker’s novel, published at the end of the Nineteenth century, moved a fictional fright out …

Continue reading

Dread chibi gods?

As part of their on-going H.P. Lovecraft Cthulhu Mythos re-read on Tor.com, Ruthanna Emrys and Anne M. Pillsworth added a Japanese anime to the list of Mythos-related works.  Kishin Houkou Demonbane follows the adventures of Kurou, a down-on-his-luck private detective/sorcerer in Arkham, who finds (or is found by) a copy of the dread Necronomicon.  In …

Continue reading

The children of the night, what tuneful tones!

In the May 2017 issue of Locus, Stefan Dziemianowicz reviews an alternative (or “lost”) version of Bram Stoker’s classic vampire novel, Dracula.  Published in Iceland(!) in the early 1900s, with the title Powers of Darkness (Makt Myrkranna), it differs from the traditional edition of Dracula published in England in 1897, in ways both small and …

Continue reading

“I usually don’t read Horror, but …”

For the scary month of October, home of Hallowe’en, the Beamers like to pick a book that can shock and frighten.  Or at least try to.  This month, we went back for a classic of the 1970s American Horror Renaissance, Ghost Story by Peter Straub.  Coming out just after Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot, it tells …

Continue reading

A long walk through a short book

As the warm weather settles in and folks think about going outdoors more and more, the Beamers settled in for a long gab about a young girl’s adventure in the woods of Maine, Stephen King country.  In a surprising twist, the King of Horror held off his patented gruesome special effects and held the Beamers …

Continue reading

Love means never having to say … I’m hungry

With winter’s deep chills settling in, the Beamers settled down to wrestle with Octavia Butler’s final work, Fledgling, the story of a young, amnesiac vampire who has to rebuild her life after her family (or families) are slain.  Taking a first-person perspective, the novel effectively drops the reader into a world and a society that …

Continue reading

The last man on Earth, alone in a room

For a warm, Spring-like evening, the Beamers tackled a classic novel about a man spending his evenings alone, staving off a horde of the undead with Science!, in Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend.  Though Robert Neville might have thought his situation clearly defined, we had a few quibbles to bring up.     

Continue reading

Simon & Schuster’s New Science Fiction Imprint

In October 2014, Simon & Shuster will launch a new speculative fiction imprint called Simon451. The first book in the imprint will be the first volume of a series co-written by actress Gillian Anderson. Hmmm… Dedicated to science fiction, fantasy, dystopian, apocalyptic and the supernatural First book by Gillian Anderson Named after the temperature of …

Continue reading

Good Grief, Charlie Brown!

Charles M. Schulz: “Stop worrying about the world ending today. It’s already tomorrow in Australia.” I’m pretty sure this isn’t what he had in mind. From WarbucksDesign

Continue reading

Laugh and the book group laughs with you

Coming out of a suddenly wet Spring, the Beamers found themselves inside a book, inside a book, taking on Jonathan Carroll’s first novel, The Land of Laughs.  With its fluidity between the “real” fiction and the “fiction” fiction of Thomas Abbey and Saxony Gardner trying to create a biography of deceased children’s author Marshall France, …

Continue reading