A clash of “Ego”

An unsurpassed vision of the Future, set 16 years in the Past

An unsurpassed vision of the Future, set 16 years in the Past

In the New Statesman, speculative fiction grandmaster Michael Moorcock reminisces on his friendship with grandmaster Arthur C. Clarke, and in particular about the making of 2001: A Space Odyssey, which film did not turn out to be the quasi-documentary on space travel that Sir Arthur was hoping it would be.  Unfortunately for the British author, noted for the rigorous scientific backgrounds of his fiction, the American director, Stanley Kubrick, favored elusive, ambiguous imagery over plain-spoken narrations, as Moorcock details in the introduction to a new edition of Clarke’s novel published by the Folio Society.

Even Clarke was not sure how to rock a Star Baby to sleep.

Even Clarke was not sure how to rock a Star Baby to sleep.

Though unable to watch the pre-release cut of the movie, upset by Kubrick’s cuts of his voice-over work and inclusion of scenes that emphasized the tedium of space travel, Clarke was reconciled by the success of the film, which translated into the success of his novel and a demand for sequels to draw out answers from Kubrick’s unexplained images.  “Each man was able to produce his own preferred version,” Moorcock concludes, thus forestalling yet another “book or movie?” debate.

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